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Composition of the Court

The Judicature (Appellate Jurisdiction) Act provides that the Judges of the Court of Appeal shall be:

a.    A President;

b.   The Chief Justice by virtue of her office as head of the Judiciary but who, however, shall not sit in the Court unless there are at least four other Judges sitting and unless she has been invited so to sit by the President of the Court;

c.    Not less than three nor more than twelve other Judges.

 

Currently the Court is comprised of a President and six (6) Judges of Appeal, and sits daily in two (2) divisions of three (3) Judges.

The President of the Court is responsible for the arrangement of the work of the Court and presides whenever he is sitting in the Court. In arranging the work of the Court he is assisted by a Registrar.

A Judge of Appeal must be an attorney-at-law who is a member of the Bar of Jamaica, England, Scotland or Northern Ireland. He or she is required to be someone who is of at least ten (10) years standing or who or has held office as a Judge of a court of unlimited civil and criminal jurisdiction in the commonwealth or a court with jurisdiction to hear appeals from any such court.

Judges of the Court of Appeal are appointed by the Governor General on the advice of the Judicial Service Commission. However, the President of the Court is appointed by the Governor General on the recommendation of the Prime Minister after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition.